1883 Jasper County Indiana Biographies

1883 Jasper County Biographies



Frank Hengesbach, manufacturer of brick and tile, is a native of Germany, born in 1839, and came to the United States in 1863. He received an academic education in his native country, after which he studied architecture, and which was his first business in this country. While residing at Chicao, he became interested in the business of tiling, and was the first person to begin a tile factory in Barkley Township; he is also interested in the same business with F. W. Bedford, at Rensselaer, in one of the largest factories of the kind in Northern Indiana. Mr. Hengesbach is one of the enterprising men and valued citizens of Jasper County, and a successful business manager.

 Counties of Warren, Benton, Jasper & Newton Indiana - Historical and Biographical
F. A. Bettey & Co., Publishers. Chicago: 1883

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Horace Edwards James was born in Evansport, Ohio, May 2, 1841. His father, Reuben B. James, was born in Deerfield, N.H., July 17, 1810. His mother was Miss Sarah Norton, born in New York December 25, 1820. These parents moved from Ohio to Michigan in 1847; to Erie County in 1949, and to Rensselaer, Ind., July 31, 1854. The elder James was a pioneer settler of Northwestern Ohio, where he held several offices, among which were Postmaster and Associate Judge. He abandoned the profession of law to become a minister in the Baptist denomination. After moving to Indiana, he lived on a farm, and taught school. He held the office of County Surveyor a term or two. When the war broke out in 1861, he was among the first to enlist, carrying a rifle during the three months' campaign, although over fifty years old. A few months after this, he received a commission as Commissary of Subsistence, with rank of Captain, and was assigned to duty on the staff of Gen. Cooper, of East Tennessee, in Gen. Schofield's Army of the Ohio, and served as such until the close of the war, when he was mustered out with the rank of Brevet Major. Three of his sons were in the army during this period. Returning to Rensselaer, Maj. James bought the material and good will of the local newspaper, and published the Prairie Telegraph from 1865 to 1868. He moved to Crawford County, Kan., in 1870, and died there March 29, 1877. He was a vigorous thinker, a ready debater, a voluminous writer, a man of progressive ideas and strong convictions, especially in religion and politiecs. His character was bold and aggressive, and he left his empress upon the society of every community in which he lived. The work of which he was most proud - the great work of his life, as he termed it - upon which were spent his best years, is a religious volume entitled "Prophetic Revelations", now out of print. The entire edition, with the exception of perhaps a few dozen copies, was destroyed by fire directly after publication, and he never afterward found means to issue another edition. Maj. James' family consisted of four sons and four daughters, who lived to years of maturity. Horace E. was the first born. Owing to the semi- nomadic life led by the family, which kept them upon the frontier settlements, and the itinerant clergyman's slender purse, the schooling of this flock of children was not extensive; still the training of a parent was such that at the age of sixteen years this oldest child procured a license and taught a successful term of district school. This occupation was followed in winter, with employment on the farm in summer, until he was twenty years old, when the war broke out and he enlisted in Company G, Ninth Regiment Indiana Volunteers. He re-enlisted as a veteran, and was in the service from August, 1861, until October, 1865. In February, 1865, he was granted a furlough. This occasion was improved to secure for a wife Miss Frances J. A. daughter of Chauncey and Julia (Jenks) Wilson, of Lake County, Ind., and a native of New York. Upon receiving his discharge, Mr. James took a postition at a case in his father's printing office. Three years afterward, October 1, 1868, he bought the office material and formed a copartnership with Col. Joshua Healy, who was then conducting a rival paper in the town, and the Rensselaer Unionwas thus established. The firm of James & Healy was dissolved in the summer of 1875, Col. Healy retiring. Soon afterward Charles M. Johnson brought over the material of the Republican office and the two papers were consolidated. During the year, Mr. Johnson of Jasper County, withdrew. In 1878, Mr. James was made chairman of the Republican Committee of Jasper County, and was also elected a member of the Republican State Committee of Indiana, representing the Tenth Congressional District. In the same year, President Hayes sent his name to the Senate for the United States Consul to Turks Island, which nomination was confirmed, but the honor declined. In March, 1879, he was appointed Postmaster at Rensselaer, and entered on duty on the 1st of April following. In October, 1880, he sold the Union newspaper and retired after eleven years of editorial life. February 14, 1881, he was commissioned Postmaster for a term of four years. In the Indiana State Republican Convention of June, 1880, he received the second highest number of votes for nomination for Secretary of State. Mr. James is the father of three daughters and three sons. The sons only are living. Their names are Francis H., Chase M., and Otto D. The subject of this sketch is an extensive reader and a hard worker; is liberal in thought and progressive in ideas rather than conservative. He has been a member of the Board of School Trustees of his town, and for 1880, 1881 and 1882 was Secretary of the Jasper County Agricultural Society.
 
Counties of Warren, Benton, Jasper & Newton Indiana - Historical and Biographical
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Abraham Leopold, merchant, was born in Grunstadt, Bavaria, in 1836. Simon Leopold, his father, was also a native of Bavaria, where he died in 1873. His mother, Sarah (Stanfeldts) Leopold, was born in the Duchy of Darmstadt, and also died in 1873. Our subject came to America and landed at Philadelphia in 1850, where he clerked for a time, then went to Pittsburgh, and thence to Cincinnati, where he clerked for two years. He then went to Iowa, and thence to Rock Island, Ill., and opened a confectionery store; thence he went to Francesville, where he engaged in mercantile business with one Heildelberg, which was continued until 1862, when he removed his stock to Rensselaer. Mr. Leopold married Miss Amelia, daughter of Philip Eltzbacher, and a native of Prussia. This union was productive of ten children - Milton, Rachel, Simon, Bernhart, Isaac, Louis, Moses, Sadie, Julia and and Infant (deceased). When Mr. Leopold landed in this country, he had but 95 cents. He commenced business at Francesville with a capital of $800, and now has one of the finest stores in the town, besides seventy acres known as Leopold's Addition to Rensselaer. This is now laid off in lots, and the streets named for his children; he has also much other property. Mr. Leopold has been School Trustee.

Counties of Warren, Benton, Jasper & Newton Indiana - Historical and Biographical
F. A. Bettey & Co., Publishers. Chicago: 1883
 


James W. McEwen, editor and proprietor of the Democratic Sentinel, is a native of Lewistown, Mifflin Co., Penn., born December 10, 1831. He is the eldest of seven children born to John S. and Isabella (Hylands) McEwen, both natives of Pennsylvania, where they reside. James W. McEwen received a common school education in youth, and at the age of seventeen began learning the printer's trade in his native town on the True Democrat, afterward on various other local papers until 1856, when he became editor of the Clinton, Penn., Democrat. In 1857 and 1858, he conducted the Independent Press, of Lewistown, Penn., and in March, 1859, emigrated to Indiana and assumed control of the White County Democrat, of which he remained editor and proprietor for eighteen years. In February, 1877, he removed to Rensselaer, established the Democratic Sentinel, and has since remained engaged here in journalistic work. Mr. McEwen is an unswerving supporter of the principles of the National Democratic party, and, in religious principles, a member of the Presbyterian Church. September 11, 1855, he married Sarah J., daughter of Henry and Ann (Willard) Jenner; she was born in Rochester, N.Y., July 16, 1837. Five children have been the result of this union - Cordelia Q., William H., George B., Anna B. and Frances E., only the last two named being now among the living.

 Counties of Warren, Benton, Jasper & Newton Indiana - Historical and Biographical
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George E. Marshall, editor and proprietor of the Rensselaer Republican, was born in Will County, Ill., October 5, 1850, and is one of eight children, six of whom are living, born to George and Margaret (Paddock) Marshall, who were native of the State of New York and of English descent. George E. Marshall was reared in his native State, receiving the major part of his schooling at Joliet, Englewood and Champaign. He read law about two years, but gave this up in order to pursue some branch of business more suitable to his disposition. For a number of years he was engaged in various occupations, teaching principally in Illinois and California, but in 1881 he came to Rensselaer and purchased an interest in the Republican. In August, 1882, he became sole proprietor, and at present has the only Republican paper in Jasper County. Mr. Marshall is a Republican, a member of the I.O.O.F. and the U.W. of Rensselaer,

 Counties of Warren, Benton, Jasper & Newton Indiana - Historical and Biographical
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David Nowels, a native of Holmes County, Ohio, and the pioneer of Jasper County, was born September 15, 1821, and is the seventh son in a family of eight sons and three daughters born to John and Hetty (Vulgamen) Nowels, natives of Kentucky and Ohio, respectively, and of English and German descent. John Nowels was among the pioneers of Ohio, and as a hunter in the State and Indiana became justly celebrated. He removed with his family to the "Hoosier State" when our subject was three years old, and selected for his home the town of Portland, on the Wabash, then county seat of Fountain County. Her Mrs. Nowels died about 1830, and in 1834, together with his daughter and her husband, Joseph Yeoman, and David Nowels, our subject, he removed to what is now Jasper County, and became the first settler. They made homes where Rensselaer now stands, but afterward moved to the northern part of the township, where Mr. Nowels died May 21, 1865, aged over ninety-five years. David Nowels has made Jasper County his home since 1834. He received no educational advantages, and in his youth and early manhood participated in the hardships of all pioneers. He purchased his time of his father when seventeen years old, went to Cass County, and obtained a position as mail carrier from Logansport to Iroquois County, Ill. After three months, he returned to Jasper County, and March 10, 1842, married Phebe A. Benjamin, daughter of Jared and Mary (Yeoman) Benjamin. Mrs. Nowel's parents were born in Connecticut and New York State respectively, and were of English Descent; this family removed to Ohio in 1814. After death of Mr. Benjamin, the widow and family, 1838, emigrated to Indiana, and settled in this county. David Nowels without means, but with industry and good management has secured a competence, retained some eighty lots in Rensselaer, the Nowels House, and other valuable business property, forty acres of land in Jasper County, and 700 acres thirty-two miles from Little Rock, Ark. Mr. Nowels, throughout his long life in this county, has acquired many friends; he and wife are living retired in Rensselaer. Mrs. Nowels is a member of the Baptist Church. They have had nine children born to them in this order: Jared, born August 29, 1843, died December 29, 1843; Ezra C., born January 20, 1845; William R., August 2, 1846; Charles D., November 14, 1847; Mary H., November 9, 1849; Eliza Jane, born July 1, 1852, died April 22, 1854; Eliza Jane, born April 1, 1854, died March 30, 1860; David B., born in 1856; and Ida A., January 14, 1859. The mother was born February 22, 1829, in Ohio. In politics, Mr. Nowels is a Democrat.

 Counties of Warren, Benton, Jasper & Newton Indiana - Historical and Biographical
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Ezra C. Nowels, County Auditor, was born in the county January 30, 1845. He was reared a farmer, and has followed the same the greater part of his life. He received a practical education, and began doing for himself on attaining his majority. October 25, 1868, he married Sarah J., daughter of Andrew J. and Americus (King) Busey, and to this union have been born six children - Myrta E., who died, aged nine years; Everette M., Lucy M., Trellyen E., Lennie E., and Odessa L. The mother was born April 5, 1852, in Miami County, Ind. Mr. Nowels is now serving as Auditor of the county. He is owner of 400 acres of good land, is a Democrat, and a member of Iroquois Lodge, No. 143, I.O.O.F. Mrs. Nowels is a member of the Baptist Church.

 Counties of Warren, Benton, Jasper & Newton Indiana - Historical and Biographical
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William R. Nowels was born in Marion Township, Jasper County, August 2, 1846, and was educated in the common schools and at Tippecanoe College. He was married, in 1868, to Miss Emma Rock, daughter of William and Eliza Rock, who reside in Tippecanoe County. Mr. Rock was formerly from Pennsylvania. Their union has been blessed with the following children: Charles E., Maybelle, Adelma Vernon, Gaylord, Bertha and Lillie. Mr. W. R. Nowels owns 291 acres of fine land in Section 36.

Counties of Warren, Benton, Jasper & Newton Indiana - Historical and Biographical
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Charles D. Nowels was born in Marion Township, Jasper County, Ind., November 14, 1847, and has made Jasper County his home. At the age of eighteen, he began doing for himself, although remaining with and assisting his parents until twenty-three years of age. September 23, 1870, he married Miss Margaret J. Burns, daughter of Oliver S. Burns, of Carroll County, Ind.; and the month of March succeeding this event, moved to a farm on Section I in Marion Township, and remained there nearly eleven years, actively engaged in farming and stock-raising. He then removed to Rensselaer on account of the ill-health of his wife. For about a year, he was engaged in the lumber and coal trade at this place, then sold out the lumber interest, and has since dealt in coal exclusively, besides attending to his stock interests. Mr. Nowels secured an academical education, has taught three terms of public school in Jasper County, and at present owns a good farm of 320 acres in one place, and in another 240. He is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Baptist Church. They are parents of two children - Arthur S. and Floy Latrue. Mrs. Nowels was born October 9, 1850.

 Counties of Warren, Benton, Jasper & Newton Indiana - Historical and Biographical
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D.B. Nowels was born in Jasper County in 1856, and finished his education at Lebanon, Ohio. He began teaching at the age of eighteen, and taught five years. In 1879, he married Miss Sarah E. Burk, daughter of George Burk. They have one child - Auburn. Mr. D.B. Nowels was chosen County Commissioner in June, 1879. He and wife are members of the Baptist Church, and reside on the old homestead.
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Joseph V. Parkison was born in Logan County, Ohio, May 16, 1829, and is a son of John and Matilda (Kenton) Parkison, both natives of Kentucky. John Parkison came to this county about 1837 and purchased land. He was the father of ten children - Eliza Ann, William, Anderson, Juliet, Margaret, Joseph V., Emma, Mary J., Isabel, and Frank, who died in the volunteer service of the late war. Mrs. Matilda Parkison's father was the celebrated Indian fighter, Simon P. Kenton, a native of Virginia, who in consequence of a love imbroglio at home, was compelled to flee to Kentucky, where, in association with Daniel Boone, he engaged in a wild life, but was afterward engaged in surveying that State. He received much land from the Government for thinning out the troublesome "redskins", and also was largely remunerated for locating the lands of others. Joseph V. Parkison was reared a farmer, and when of age was given 240 acres by his father. About 1852, he married Miss Fannie Kenton, whose father was one of this country's early pioneers. Their union was graced by seven children - Mary M., born October 9, 1852; William W., born November 5, 1854; Eveline, born January 1, 1857; Amanda E., born November 14, 1858; Josephine, born January 1, 1862; Margaret, born October 9, 1865; and Jaley A., born April 24, 1868.

 Counties of Warren, Benton, Jasper & Newton Indiana - Historical and Biographical
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Berry Parris is a native of Clark County, Ky., was born in 1825, and is a son of James and Anna (May) Parris, the former a native of Pennsylvania, the latter of Virginia. They reared the following family: Sarah, John, Nancy, Fannie, Stephen, Joshua, Mary, Berry, Asa, Amanda, James M., Harrison, George, Eliza and Pamelia. Mr. Parris died in Highland County, Ohio, and was a soldier of 1812. Berry Parris was brought to Highland County, Ohio, as a child, but afterward returned to Kentucky and remained nine years, when he moved to Grant County, Ohio, lived to manhood, and married Sarah, daughter of Daniel and Mary Starbuck, natives of North Carolina. Mr. Parris is an enterprising farmer, and has a good farm near Rensselaer, all the acquirement of his industry and thrift. He is also a much esteemed citizen.

 Counties of Warren, Benton, Jasper & Newton Indiana - Historical and Biographical
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Simon Phillips was born in Darke County, Ohio, in 1823, and is a son of Valentine and Abigail (Crawford) Phillips. Valentine Phillips was a native of Maryland, who emigrated to Ohio at an early day, and there married. In 1825, he removed to Rush County, Ind., where he died in 1842, and Mrs. Phillips in 1845, leaving the following issue: John, Susan and Simon. Valentine Phillips was a soldier of the war of 1812, as were also his two brothers - John and Simon, the latter have been a Captain. Our subject came to this county in 1847, where he married Miss Nancy Irvin, daughter of Alexander and Charity Irvin, to which union succeeded eight children - William, Elza, Abigail, Emily, Nancy, Robert, Agnes and Augustus. Mr. Phillips first located in Hanging Grove Township, then on a farm near Rensselaer, which contained the only stone quarry in the county. He was Captain of the vigilance committee in the early time, and was a terror to horse thieves and such people; he was made Sheriff in1856, and in1882 a keeper of the county house. The grandfather of Mr. Phillips was a Revolutionary soldier, and was wounded by a bayonet thrust from the knee to the groin.

 Counties of Warren, Benton, Jasper & Newton Indiana - Historical and Biographical
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Charles H. Price, Circuit Clerk, was born in Portage County, Ohio, in 1849. His father, William B. Price, was born in Canada in 1820, and came to Jasper County, Ind., in 1867. He was elected Commissioner in 1876, and re-elected in 1878, was an able officer, and gave great satisfaction. Charles H. Price was educated in the common schools, and subsequently took a collegiate course at Stockwell, Ind. He was married in 1874 to Miss Lizzie A. Jones. They have two children - Max and Don. Mr. Price, on the paternal side, is of Irish, and on the maternal side is of Scotch progenitors. He is a Knight Templar in the Masonic order, an Odd Fellow and Knight of Pythias, and in the last two has passed the chairs; he is also a charter member of the Knights of Pythias at Remington, and Grand Guardian of the State, having orgainzed the lodge in Rensselaer.In 1874, he was elected Circuit Clerk, and re-elected in 1880. Mr. Price is an efficient officer, and a fine orator. He was a delegate to the convention which nominated Weaver for President; also Secretary of the Greenback County Central Committee.

 Counties of Warren, Benton, Jasper & Newton Indiana - Historical and Biographical
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J. T. Randle, retired farmer, is a native of Hampshire County, W. Va., and was born in 1831. His father and mother, Thomas and Nancy (Culp) Randle, were natives of the same county, the former born in 1798, the latter in 1802, and were married in their native county. Thomas Randle, in company with a brother-in-law, came to this State, having been induced so to do by a brother of Mr. Randle, who had previously located on the Wabash River. They came in four-horse wagons, and were twenty- seven days on the journey. Mr. Randle entered a half section in this county, on which he lived until his death, in 1870. Mrs. Randle died in 1852. They were the parents of eleven children, eight of whom are living - James, Mary, Isabel, Henry, John, Nelson, Nancy and Savia. J. T. Randle was married in 1854, to Miss Mary E. Overton, who died in 1877. He afterward married Mrs. Ruth A. Harris, by which union they have five children - Robert, Thomas, John, Emeline and Edward. Mrs. Randle is a daughter of Rial and Sarah Ann Benjamin.

 Counties of Warren, Benton, Jasper & Newton Indiana - Historical and Biographical
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Nelson Randle was born in Jasper County, Ind., December 23, 1844. In 1865, he married to Miss Caroline Brown, born in 1848, daughter of George H. and Elizabeth (Nichols) Brown. They had a family of five children - Edward, Virginia (deceased), Juliette, Addie May (deceased), and James. Mr. Randle is owner of 500 acres of land in Section 36, Township 30, Range 6. Mrs. Randle's father, George H. Brown, was a pioneer settler, and was twice elected to the Legislature from Jasper County.

Counties of Warren, Benton, Jasper & Newton Indiana - Historical and Biographical
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John G. Reynolds was born in White County, Ind., in 1845. His father, Benjamin Reynolds, was the second settler in White County, where he resided thirty-nine years, and died June 6, 1869. He was one of the most sympathizing, determined and remarkable men of his time. He was a kind husband and father, whose motto was equity. He left a wife and nine children, with innumerable friends to mourn for him. A Logansport paper said: "Benjamin Reynolds, Esq., of White County, died at his residence after an illness of some days. Mr. Reynolds was one of the oldest settlers in this section, having come to Indiana in 1830, and has long been identified with the progressive interest of that portion of the State. Mount Jackson, the home of Mr. Reynolds, was known far and near, and no one knew better how to entertain after the old-fashioned, hosptiable manner, and none made his guests more at home, than did "Uncle Ben", as he was familiarly called. He leaves a large property, that he accumulated through economy and industry, to a family of nine children, and is gathered to his rest in the fullness of his years. May he rest in peace!"

Counties of Warren, Benton, Jasper & Newton Indiana - Historical and Biographical
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Carol J. Wood

Harvey W. Wood

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