1916 Jasper County Biographies


WILLIAM M HOOVER Though a resident of Indiana since infancy, William M. Hoover was born in Ross County, Ohio, August 27, 1844, a son of Alford and Margaret (Roselle) Hoover, his father a native of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, and his mother of Ohio. In 1846 the family moved from Ohio to Warren County, Indiana, and in 1854 joined the early pioneer settlers of Jasper County, locating on a tract of wild land in Section 12 of Marion Township. It was in that locality that Alford Hoover spent his declining years. He was a cooper by trade, but followed farming after his removal to Indiana. The mother of William M. Hoover died February 6, 1904, in very advanced age.

Eighteen months of age when brought to Indiana, William M. Hoover was reared partly in Warren and partly in Jasper County, attended such common schools as were in existence at that time, and had reached the age of seventeen when he responded to the call for volunteers at one of the critical times of the Civil war. He enlisted August 11, 1862, in Company A of the Eighty- seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry.

Mr. Hoover married, on the 14th of February, 1867, Miss Nancy J. Adams, who was born in Miami County, Indiana, August 4, 1848, a daughter of Isaac and Anne (Iddings) Adams, and she was reared and educated in her native county. Three sons have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hoover. Alford A., a resident of Marion Township, where he is engaged in agricultural pursuits, was liberally educated. He married Miss Evaline Jackson. William I., a residents of Rensselaer, is mentioned elsewhere in this work. Frank I., resides with his parents on the farm. He graduated in the Rensselaer High School, and then matriculated in the state university at Bloomington. He married Miss Leo Knox and they are members of the Christian Church.

The Standard History of Jasper and Newton Counties
The Lewis Publishing Company - Chicago and New York - 1916

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GEORGE E. MURRAY He was born at Leesburg, Ohio, April 13, 1857, and is a son of Gilbert E. and Henrietta (Sweney) Murray. On the paternal side the ancestry is Scotch and on the maternal is Irish, a combination that has notable resulted in sturdy characteristics in descendants. The father of Mr. Murray died when he was six years old and his burial was at Leesburg. After this bereavement the mother of Mr. Murray removed with him to Kokomo, Indiana, and there he attended school and spent his boyhood. By the time he was seventeen years of age, however, this period of irresponsibility was over and he started out to make his own way in the world, his success depending entirely upon his own efforts.

In June, 1889, Mr. Murray was united in marriage with Miss Charlotte O. Hester, who is a daughter of Francis A. and Rebecca (Slack) Hester, residents of Charlestown, Indiana, and they have two children: Helen F. and Gerald E.

The Standard History of Jasper and Newton Counties
The Lewis Publishing Company - Chicago and New York - 1916

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JOHAN HANSSON D.V.S. Johan Hansson, veterinary surgeon, Rensselaer, Indiana, has been a resident of the United States for twenty-six years and of Jasper County five years. He was born in Sweden, July 13, 1870. His father, Hans Martinson, spent his entire life in Sweden, dying there in 1879. His mother, Anna (Erlandson) Martinson, still survives and lives in Sweden, now aged eight years. Her family was not large but all survive: Martin, the eldest, is a farmer in Sweden, unmarried; Arlland, who conducts the home farm at Cimbris, Sweden, is married but has no children; Johan was the third born; and Annetta, the youngest, resides with the aged mother. The paternal grandfather, Martin Martinson, served as an officer in Sweden's army.

In 1910 Doctor Hansson came to Rensselaer, Indiana, and has here built up a practice of large proportions, from which he has been able to afford himself and family all the comforts and many of the luxuries of life. Since coming here he has purchased a fine farm of 105 acres, situated in Newton township, and owns also a finely equipped establishment in the town for professional purposes. It was a source of expressed gratification to him when, recently, he had the coveted privilege of entertaining in his beautiful home, one whom he regards with feeling of deepest esteem, Dr. L. A. Merrilat, dean of McKillip Veterinary College. He was able to show Dr. Merrilat that his benefactions and extreme kindness in connection with the former's course in that college had not been unworthily bestowed and the visit was mutually agreeable.

In 1882 Doctor Hansson was united in marriage with Miss Catherine Reed, and they have two children: Greveleus and Annetta. Dr. Hansson is a member of the Lutheran Church, having been confirmed in the same when fifteen years old.

The Standard History of Jasper and Newton Counties
The Lewis Publishing Company - Chicago and New York - 1916

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HENRY FRANKLIN KING William H. King, the father of this sketch, was a native of Hancock County, Indiana, where he was reared. He there married Anna Hall, and in 1882 came to Jasper County, locating on a farm one mile north of Rensselaer. For the greater part of his life he followed farming, his death occurring in 1909. His widow survives him. Their family numbered seven children, of whom six are yet living.

Henry Franklin King, who was the youngest son but one of William H. and Anna (Hall) King, was born in Hancock County, Indiana, May 17, 1874. He was eight years old when he accompanied his parents to Jasper County where he has since made his home. Reared on the farm, he was educated in the public schools of Rensselaer and began industrial life as a laborer, at five dollars a week, when fifteen years old. Having an economical disposition, he saved his means and in 1900 at twenty-six years of age, was in a small way enabled to go into the hitch barn business, in which he continued for about two years. His success in this enterprise showed for the first time his remarkable aptitude for buying things that had become practical failures and building them up to profitable properties. He then engaged in the livery business with Daniel Waymire and was identified with for about eighteen months. During this time they bought the blacksmith and repair shop now owned by Mr. King, and eventually the combined business was divided, Mr. King securing for his equity the shop and other consideration. Although he knew practically nothing as a tradesman or mechanic, he realized that the shop was in a run-down condition. He at once remedied this state of things, put in a proper equipment, engaged first class workmen, and soon had it on a profitable paying basis. This industry he has continued to operated ever since. During the time that he was engaged in these enterprises he became interested in Jasper County realty, and from time to time added to his original purchase until he now owns 140 acres of land, forty acres in Marion and 100 acres in Newton Township. Mr. King was married, November 20, 1898, to America M. Cripps, and they have four children: Walter C., Elizabeth, Katherine and Robert.

The Standard History of Jasper and Newton Counties
The Lewis Publishing Company - Chicago and New York - 1916

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RANDLE FAMILY The history of the pioneers of Jasper County must take up the Randle family almost at the beginning. Whether considered from the standpoint of priority of residence or from their notable activities as home makers in the wilderness and in the community affairs of the early times, the Randles are among the most conspicuous names in Jasper County. From Barkley Township, where they were the first settlers, their influence as land owners and citizens has been woven into the warp and woof of county history in many interesting ways.

This record must first concern Thomas Randle. Born in Hampshire County in what is now the State of West Virginia, but was then Virginia, January 9, 1798, a son of James and Mary (Shields) Randle, who came originally from New Jersey, he grew up on a farm in Western Virginia and among his early experiences learned to operate his father's flouring mill on Patterson's Creek. While living in Hampshire County, he married Nancy Culp. Then in 1832 he and his brother-in-law, George Culp, with their families, came to Indiana. Their mode of conveyance was a four-horse wagon, which not only served to transport the women and children but also a supply of household goods, implements and other necessities for existence on the frontier to which they were bound. After twenty-seven days of travel over rough ways, through forests and swamps, much of the time over new made roads and blazed trails, the families located about four miles south of the present site of Delphi in the Wabash River Valley. The family lived there until about 1835, but in 1834 Mr. Randle and Mr. Culp came to what is now Jasper County and secured lands in Sections 4 and 5 of what is now Barkley Township. Here they worked industriously for several days, erecting round log cabins, covered with clapboard roofs, puncheon floors and with stick and mud chimneys. They also harvested a crop of wild hay, which then grew plentifully on the prairies. In the spring of 1835 Mr. Randle and Mr. Culp moved their families to their newly chosen home, and that must be accepted as the record of the establishment of the first two families in what is now Barkley Township.

Thomas Randle, though of but ordinary education, was a man of more than average intelligence. He stood long as a stalwart figure in the early community, served as one of the early commissioners of Jasper County and for years administered justice through the office of justice of the peace. He and his good wife became the parents of four sons and four daughters. Three of these sons are still living. Many of their descendants are still found in Jasper County, and this substantial family stock has also supplied citizens to other counties and states. Thomas Randle died in Jasper County December 11, 1870, having survived his wife several years. Both were Methodists in religion and became identified with the first church organization in their township. Of their children, James T. and Nelson are the sons still living, and all have their homes in Rensselaer. The other children were John, Mary, Isabel, Nancy Virginia and Savina.

The distinction of being the oldest living resident of Jasper County belongs to James T. Randle, a son of Thomas and now spending the evening of his lifetime at Rensselaer. He was born in Hampshire County, West Virginia, October 10, 1831, and was an infant when brought to Indiana in the old wagon conveyance above mentioned. His home has been within the limits of Jasper County for fully eighty years, and no other resident has a fund of recollections dating back to an earlier time than he. The years of his developing youth were spent in assisting with the planting and harvesting, and he has used every type of farm tool that has been in vogue during the changing epochs of farming industry. As a young man he swung the old fashioned cradle for reaping grain and also the flail for beating out the kernels from the straw and chaff, plowed with the old wooden moldboard, was full grown when the first railroad came through Jasper County, and was past middle age when the wonderful inventions of electricity were introduced to civilization. Such education as he obtained was acquired in the Pleasant Grove school in a building built of logs, with slab seats and the window openings covered by greased paper. In that school the teaching was rigidly limited to the three R's.

On June 20, 1854, James T. Randle married Mary E. Overton, whose parents, James and Emeline (Parker) Overton, were among the early settlers of Hanging Grove Township. Shortly after his marriage James T. Randle settled on a place of his own adjoining the old homestead. He lived there and on the old home place, which he had acquired by purchase, until 1883, when he moved to Rensselaer, which has ever since been his home. Through his own exertions he became one of the most prosperous land holders of Jasper County, and at one time was the owner of 1,800 acres of land, most of which has subsequently been divided among his children. The stock interests of Jasper County have special reason to appreciate the work of James T. Randle, since he was one of the first men in the county to appreciate the value of blooded stock and acting on this belief introduced some of the first blooded animals onto the farms of Jasper County. He and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. She died August 14, 1877, leaving five children as follows: Robert, Thomas, John A., Emeline, wife of D.S.Makeever, and Edward J. On November 24 1878, Mr. Randle married Ruth A. Harris, daughter of Rial B. Benjamin and the widow of William Harris. The second Mrs. Randle died January 24, 1898. On May 25, 1899, he married for his third wife Mrs. Julia Enslen, who died May 14, 1910. Of Mr. Randle's children, two sons live in Kansas and one in Oklahoma. The only two still living in Jasper County are Edward J. and Mrs. Makeever.

The responsibilities of the third generation of this family now rest upon the shoulders of Edward J. Randle, whose name is well known throughout Jasper County as a farmer and stock man. He was born here August 19, 1872, and has spent his life so far within the limits of his native county. He attended the common and high schools at Rensselaer, and has been identified with farming and stock raising for over twenty years.

Mr. Randle is a democrat in politics, and is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias. On September 3, 1896, he married Lura Yeoman, a daughter of Andrew K. and Elizabeth (Bram) Yeoman. Mrs. Randle died August 29, 1910, leaving one son, Walter. On December 30, 1913, he married Alice E. Shedd, daughter of S. S. and Emma (Porter) Shedd.

The Standard History of Jasper and Newton Counties
The Lewis Publishing Company - Chicago and New York - 1916

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EDWARD D RHOADES Born April 11, 1854, at Winslow, Maine, Edward D. Rhoades was brought to Jasper County when three years of age. He is one of four living children in a family of seven whose parents were Charles and Mary (Duran) Rhoades. They were likewise natives of Maine, were reared and married in the old Pine Tree State, and during his youth Charles Rhoades had learned the harness maker's trade, was known as a hard working and intelligent citizen, and he and his wife lived at Rensselaer until taken away by death several years ago. Their family made a conspicuous record during the Civil war, in which three of their sons saw active service. William H. was a member of the old Ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry in Company G under General Milroy and rose to the rank of first lieutenant in his company. The son, Charles G. of the same company and regiment, was killed while on scout duty. The other son, Marshall D., served in the 48th Indiana Volunteer Infantry.

On September 6, 1879, Mr. Edward D. Rhoades married Miss Lora H. Hopkins, a daughter of Raphael J. Hopkins of Rensselaer. To their marriage have been born two children: Leonard C. is now associated with his father in the hardware business at Rensselaer, while Lillian is the wife of Charles Radcliff of Louisville, Kentucky.

The Standard History of Jasper and Newton Counties
The Lewis Publishing Company - Chicago and New York - 1916

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C. E. TRIPPLET MD There are two men still living in Newton County who have the name of C. E. Tripplet. Both are physicians, though the older is now retired from active practice, and the burdens of the profession are carried on by his son. For fully sixty years Doctor Tripplet, father and son, have carried their professional services into the homes of Newton County people. The older doctor was one of the pioneers of the profession in this section of Northwestern Indiana. He practiced at a time when there were practically no roads, when in the absence of drug stores the physician carried most of his medicines in his saddle bags, and when attendance upon patients involved long and trying journeys and the exercise of tremendous physical fortitude and endurance as well as professional skill.

Doctor Tripplet, Sr., was a native of Kentucky and is of English ancestry. He was left an orphan and grew up with his grandfather until he was thirteen years of age. This grandfather was also a prominent physician and surgeon, was at one time connected with the Louisville Medical College, and it was from him that Doctor Tripplet, Sr., received his thorough training for the practice of medicine.

In 1856 Doctor Tripplet, Sr., came to Newton County. That was then an almost unbroken wilderness, and his advent proved a great boon to the pioneers. He located in Morocco and from that point for many years carried on the work of his profession over a wide territory. He continued in active practice until 1900.

He has been not only a successful physician, but equally successful in the management of his business affairs. He became largely identified with farming and stock raising in Newton County, and still owns 800 acres of land. At one time he owned 6,000 acres in Newton County. He has never neglected the public welfare, and has been a liberal contributor to every enterprise in his community. He is a prominent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is now eighty- three years of age and is enjoying the comforts of retirement at Morocco, and an object of special esteem because the oldest living representative of the medical profession in the county. He has two children, Doctor Tripplet, Jr., and a daughter.

Dr. C. E. Tripplet, Jr., was born at Morocco, July 5, 1863, and acquired a liberal education. He had some experience at farming, and his early tutor in medicine was his father. In 1895 he graduated M.D. from Rush Medical College of Chicago, and since September, 1897, has been one of the hard working and skillful doctors of Morocco. He ranks as one of the able physicians not only of Newton County but of Northern Indiana. He is connected with the various medical societies and also with the Masonic Lodge and Morocco Lodge No. 273, Knights of Pythias. Politically he is a democrat.

The Standard History of Jasper and Newton Counties
The Lewis Publishing Company - Chicago and New York - 1916

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For any further information on these families, please contact
Carol J. Wood
Harvey W. Wood

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