1916 Jasper County Biographies


JUDSON H. PERKINS.The present clerk of the Jasper County Circuit Court has been identified by residence with Newton and Jasper counties for more than thirty-five years. His career before coming to Indiana was passed largely as a teacher, and in Jasper and Newton counties he was for a long time a successful agriculturist, and for more than twenty years ha been a resident of Rensselaer and was engaged in business until his election to his present office. Mr. Perkins is a well informed and courteous official, a master of the details of his office, and has succeeded in his ambition in making the performance of his duties an important factor in the smooth and expeditious administration of justice in his county.

Judson H. Perkins was born in Michigan on a farm near Adrian in Lenawee County May 8, 1847. His parents were Elmeron and Eliza B. (Church) Perkins, his father a native of Warren County, New York, and his mother of Eastern New York. Elmeron Perkins was a farmer, and became a pioneer of Southern Michigan, settling in Lenawee County of that state about the middle of the decade of the '30s. He continued to live in Michigan until 1856, and then moved out to Grundy County, Illinois, where he died November 19, 1881. Of a family of five children three are still living.

Judson H. Perkins was nine years old when the family went to Illinois, and he grew to manhood in that state. By a good deal of self-sacrifice and hard work he accomplished his early ambition to secure a liberal education. He attended country schools and also the public schools at Morris, Illinois, the Morris Classical Institute, and finished his training in the Illinois State Normal School at Bloomington. In the meantime he had qualified for teaching and for several years alternated between the schoolroom in which was instructor and the institutions in which he was pursuing his own higher education. For fourteen school years, Mr. Perkins did some very able work as a teacher in Illinois, five years of that time being spent as superintendent of the Gardner Public Schools.

On March 31, 1875, he married Miss Ada Brumbach. Four years later, in 1879, he came to Newton County, Indiana, where he had previously purchased land, and began the work of its development and continued as an agriculturist in that county until the spring of 1891. He then sold his Newton County property and moved to Marion Township in Jasper County, where he continued farming until 1893. In that year he came into Rensselaer, and was engaged in the windmill and pump business at the county seat until 1912.

In the meantime, in 1910, Mr. Perkins, who for many years has been interested in local affairs and a figure in local politics, was elected to the office of Circuit Court clerk and took up the active duties of that office in 1912. In 1914 he was reelected, but at this writing has not yet begun his second term. He is a republican, and a member of the Baptist Church.

Mr. and Mrs. Perkins have two children of their own, Stella, wife of Jay 2. Stockton of Rensselaer; and Ethel C., who is now deputy clerk under her father. Mrs. Perkins died February 19, 1909. In 1889 they took into their home a small boy, whose adopted name is Samuel G. Perkins and he is still a member of the Perkins household.

A Standard History of Jasper and Newton Counties Indiana
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FRANCIS MARION PARKER.It is now nearly seventy years since the Parker family became identified with Jasper County. They were pioneers in the true sense of the word. When a consideration is had of the effective forces which brought about the county of the present time, a large share of credit must be given to such families as the Parkers. They were here in the log cabin stage of development. There were few roads when they came, and they helped to make highways, develop cultivated tracts of land, build better homes, establish schools and churches, and in every way they used their influence to promote what is good and uplifting in a community.

Bunyan Parker, who was the leader of this family into the wilderness of Jasper County, arrived during the late fall of the year 1847 and settled in Gillam Township. With him came his wife and five sons and four daughters. One son had died in infancy in Ohio. Bunyan Parker and wife were both natives of Pennsylvania, were substantial farming people, and had come from the vicinity of Urbana, Ohio, to Indiana. Bunyan Parker was born February 21, 1796, and about 1825 he married Mary Haines, who was born July 27, 1805. When still a boy Bunyan Parker enlisted and served as a soldier in the War of 1812.

After spending one winter in Gillam Township the family moved in the spring of 1848 to Barkley Township, where Bunyan Parker spent the rest of his days until his death on October 22, 1875. He and his family had accomplished the journey from Ohio to Jasper County by horses and wagons. He had always lived in a wooded country, and like many of the early settlers he could not believe that the prairie land was equal in fertility and other advantages to that which was covered by a heavy forest growth. Therefore on settling in Barkley Township he located in the midst of the woods, and cleared off many acres to convert it into a farm. He was a typical pioneer, hard working and thrifty. He had an inherent horror of debt, and what he could not buy he usually did without. Honest to the cent, as was the usual case of most of the early settlers, he commanded universal respect. He was in ideal neighbor and was helpful in every form of individual distress in the community. Of his children only one is now living. One of the sons, Henry Jackson, served in the Union Army during the Civil War and was fatally wounded at Chickamauga. He was in Company A of the 87th Indiana Volunteer Infantry.

Francis Marion Parker, of Rensselaer, the only surviving child of the late Bunyan Parker and wife, has spent his active career as a prosperous farmer, and has a range of recollection and experience in Jasper County such as is possessed by few living citizens. He was born in Ohio October 20, 1843, and was only four years of age when the family moved to Jasper County. His boyhood days were spent in an intermittent attendance at such public schools as were kept up in this county during the decade of the '50s, but he developed his capacity for hard work by helping to grub, clear, plant and harvest. At the age of twenty-one he started out for himself as a farm hand, but after about a year he returned home owing to the advanced age of his father, and assumed most of the responsibilities about the old homestead.

He continued in that way until he was twenty-five, and then on November 23, 1868, he married Mahala J. Walker. She was born September 20, 1841, daughter of Samuel Walker. Soon after his marriage, Mr. Parker began farming on his own responsibility. That has been his steady vocation down to the present time, though his prosperity and the fruits of many years of well directed labor have enable him to take life somewhat leisurely. He now owns 413 acres of Jasper County lands, divided into two separate farms. In 1893 Mr. Parker moved to the northern suburbs of Rensselaer, and has since lived there, enjoying the comforts and conveniences of town life and at the same time supervising his farming interests.

Mrs. Parker died December 14, 1913. She was a member of the Christian Church. To their marriage were born five children: Laura, who died in infancy; Korah A., who died April 11, 1906, married Miss Bessie Makeever and had two children; Oren F., a merchant at Rensselaer; Clara E. is the widow of John Andrus, who died November 29, 1912, and their only son, John Francis, died March 14, 1913; and Wayne Dee died February 27, 1906, when still a young man and while pursuing his studies preparatory to a professional career. Mr. Parker is a member of the Christian Church and in politics is stanchly aligned with the prohibition cause.

A Standard History of Jasper and Newton Counties Indiana
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WILLIAM PERRY BAKER. One of the pioneer personalities who gave the strength of their character and their industry to the upbuilding of Jasper County was the late William Perry Baker and the record of his life runs like a thread of honor and integrity through the greater part of Jasper County's history since the time of early settlement. It was not in the conspicuous and abnormal events of the world that he figured, but in the commonplace routine of duty, in the fulfillment of his obligations as a man and citizen, and he deserves an enduring place in this historical record.

It was on Christmas Day, 1913, that William Perry Baker went to his final reward. He was born on a farm near Bucyrus in Crawford County, Ohio, August 14, 1838, and had therefore completed three-quarters of a century of life. His parents were Benajah and Mary (Houk) Baker, and of their nine children only one is still left. In 1852 the family moved from Ohio to Jasper County, Indiana. This county was then sparsely settled, only a comparatively few farms had been broken out from the woods and the prairies, and all life and customs were still on a primitive basis. The Baker family were not rich when they came to Jasper County and their first location was on the farm now owned by Granville Moody. Several years later the father acquired land of his own, and in the more than sixty years since their advent the name has always stood for solid attainments.

Since he was fourteen years of age until his death, William Perry Baker was a resident of Jasper County. On May 2, 1856, he married Maria Rees. He was an exceptionally hard working and industrious man. Both he and his wife lived exemplary lives and through their frugality accumulated considerable property. Mr. Baker was one of the old-fashioned characters now fast passing away. With only a limited schooling, he possessed an unusual fund of good practical sense. His marked characteristics were his love of home, his industry and economy, and his rigid and unswerving honesty and his unblemished character as a man and citizen.

Mrs. Baker was born May 29, 1844, in Barkley Township of Jasper County, a member of one of the first pioneer families. Her parents were Major John and Eliza G. (Hogue) Rees, who found a home in Barkley Township along with or soon after the coming of the very first settlers. Mrs. Baker grew to womanhood in Jasper County, became one of the early teachers, and was her husband's valuable aid in many of his business transactions. She died October 9, 1914. She was a Presbyterian by early training, but in later life with her husband joined the Methodist Church.

The Rees family was of a mingled Scotch and Welsh ancestry, and in the various generations back as far as record goes there was a minister of the Presbyterian faith in almost regular succession. Eliza G. Hogue, the mother of Mrs. Baker, was of a family that settled in Virginia, probably near Richmond, in colonial days, and she herself was a native of that state. The Hogues became extensive planters and slave owners. Rev. Mr. Hogue, the grandfather of Mrs. Rees, left to each of his children, among other property, two slaves. For forty years or more he had charge of one church in old Virginia.

To Mr. and Mrs. Baker were born two children. The son, Lawrence W., is now a resident in the West. Vivian, the daughter, married Clement Taylor Boicourt, and is now living at Rensselaer, Indiana. She is the mother of three children: Loren Edward, Hillman Eugene and Frances Leona. Mrs. Boicourt is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Clement T. Boicourt was a native of White County, Indiana, born near Wolcott July 15, 1874. He grew to manhood there and received a practical education, having been a graduate of the Wolcott High School. He later entered a dry goods store and continued as a salesman for some time, and it was while engaged as a clerk that he became acquainted with Miss Vivian Baker, to whom he was married on the 3rd of February, 1903. He then engaged in the dry goods business in Wolcott, thus continuing from 1903 to 1914, and closing out the business only on account of ill health. Soon after the death of his father-in-law, William P. Baker, he moved to Rensselaer with his family, and resided there until his death, May 4, 1915. Mr. Boicourt was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, which he joined when but ten years of age, and continued as a faithful member. He was a gentleman of the strictest integrity and honor, and was held in the highest esteem by all who knew him, and his friends and acquaintances were many. At his death he left a father, E. J. Boicourt, and a step-mother at Wolcott, also a brother at Beach Wood, Indiana, and his widow and three children. A Standard History of Jasper and Newton Counties Indiana
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FRANK FOLTZ.There has been a marked tendency in recent years for men to leave the professions and the strenuous walks of commercial endeavor and engage in the "back to the land" movement. This has been the experience of Frank Foltz, who for many years was actively engaged in the practice of law at Rensselaer, but who is now entirely out of the profession and gives the full scope of his energies to the management of several farms in Jasper County. Mr. Foltz may be said to be a farmer to the manner born, and in giving up his profession in favor of agriculture is merely responding to the call of his first love.

Frank Foltz was born July 20, 1859, his birth place being half a mile south of Romney, near Lafayette in Tippecanoe County. His parents were Cyrus and Mary A. (Rogers) Foltz, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Indiana. Cyrus Foltz was a farmer in Tippecanoe County, moved from there into White County in 1868, lived on a farm south of Wolcott until the spring of 870, then moved to Oxford in Benton County, where he engaged in the meat market business. He died at Oxford in 1885.

Frank Foltz was about eleven years old when the family removed to Oxford, and in that village most of his early associations were formed, and under the direction of his father he learned the butcher trade. It was there too that he received the greater part of his scholastic training. While his education has been self acquired in the greater part, it has not been necessarily limited below the standards of liberal accomplishment. For the training which he has found of most value in life, Mr. Foltz gives credit to B. F. Johnson, ex-state statistician, and to Judge Simon P. Thompson. His practical career began in 1876, when seventeen years old, as a Benton County farmer. His father bought eighty-three acres three miles north of Oxford as the testing ground for his son's apprenticeship at agriculture, and it should be noted that this land is still part of Mr. Foltz's extensive land holdings. He was engaged in farming there until 1881, and then came to Jasper County to become manager of Judge S. P. Thompson's ranch near what is now Parr. A year later he returned to Oxford, and for several years continued as a farmer in the summer season and taught school during the winter term. Mr. Foltz took up the study of law in the winter of 1884-85 under the direction of Judge S. P. Thompson. His father died in April, 1885, and in March, 1886, he came with his mother to Rensselaer, where he earned his living as an employee in the office of Judge Thompson and at the same time carried on his legal studies. Admitted to the bar in the spring of 1886, he did his first practice before the courts of the justices of the peace and in the employ of Judge Thompson. When Judge Thompson was elevated to the bench in 1896, Mr. Foltz, Charles G. Spitler and Harry R. Kurrie entered into a partnership under the firm name of Foltz, Spitler & Kurrie. From this firm Mr. Kurrie retired in 1904 and as Foltz and Spitler it continued until January, 1910, when it was dissolved by mutual consent. Mr. Foltz was in an individual practice until July, 1911, at which date he leased his office and spent the next two years in closing up all his engagements and affairs as a lawyer. The last important act in his career as a member of the bar came in 1913 when he sold his law library and law fixtures. Since then he has given his undivided attention to his extensive farming interests. His holdings as a farmer comprise 692 acres of land, divided among four farms, three of which are in Jasper and one in Benton County. Needless to say he is one of the practical and most successful managers of the resources of the soil in Jasper County.

Mr. Foltz is a republican, but has never sought and would never accept a public office. On October 20, 1886, he married Miss Eva Kolb, daughter of Dr. Jonathan Kolb, who was an old time medical practitioner at Oxford, Indiana, until his death. Mrs. Foltz died September 1, 1910. On May 21, 1911, Mr. Foltz married Miss Blanche Hoyes, daughter of George W. and Hester A. (Nowles) Hoyes.

A Standard History of Jasper and Newton Counties Indiana
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WILLIAM MEYERS. The late William Meyers was one of the fine substantial and prosperous citizens of Jasper County. He was of German birth and parentage, had all the thrifty virtues of the fatherland and made a most admirable American citizen. He established his home in Jasper County on March 11, 1872, and before his death his name was associated with the ownership of the most extensive and valuable tract of farming land in the county.

Born in Hanover, Germany, July 5, 1817, he was christened John Friedrich William Meyers, but after coming to America was known simply as William Meyers. Reared and educated in his native country, when twenty-eight, in order to escape the compulsory military duty imposed on all able bodied male citizens, he left the land of his birth and after a six weeks voyage on board a sailing vessel landed at New York City in 1845. He came directly on to Ohio, and for a time was employed as a farm hand near the city of Cincinnati on the banks of the Ohio river, near the town of California. While living there he met and married Mary Dinkleman. With the encouragement and cooperation of a loyal and industrious wife he went on a farm as a renter, and had already made a considerable advance toward and independent competence when he moved in March, 1872, to Jasper County. Here he invested in land in Walker Township, and in that locality was for the greater part of his remaining years one of the most progressive farmers and stock raisers. By economy and industry he acquired some eight hundred acres of land--and this to a degree that is exceptional--represented entirely the work of his own hands and his intelligent management. William Meyers had come to America without knowledge of language or customs of the New World. He learned to speak and read English by attending a kindergarten class in a Protestant Sunday School. He became an American in every sense of the word, was a law abiding, patriotic citizen, and could ever be depended upon to bear his share towards responsibilities which rest upon a community as a whole and which must be borne by individual citizens. At first he was a democrat, but in 1856 on the birth of the republican party cast his vote for General John C. Fremont, and from that time forward was loyal to the Grand Old Party. William Meyers died in 1899, being then past eighty years of age. His wife had passed away October 2, 1891. Of their nine children six grew to maturity, and four are still living.

Occupying the fifth position among these children of William and Mary Meyers, George F. Meyers was born July 18, 1862, near Cincinnati, Ohio, where were also born his brothers and sisters. He was ten years of age when brought to Jasper County and for more that thirty years has been one of the leading citizens, a teacher, farmer, real estate man and leader in public affairs.

His boyhood days were spent on the farm, and his body and mind were developed by the duties of the household and the fields and in the meantime he profited by attendance at the district schools. For five terms he had charge of a school in one of the county districts of Jasper County, and in the intervals of this work was also a farmer. Farming was his regular vocation up to 1895, at which time he embarked in the real estate business at Kniman. Since 1902 Mr. Meyers has lived at Rensselaer and is one of the old established and reliable real estate dealers of the city.

For one year he served by appointment as a member of the city council, and in 1909 was elected mayor and gave an administration of that office through the term of four years which is still remembered gratefully by all friends of progress and improvement. Mr. Meyers is a republican. He was married February 16, 1890, to Anna L. Kennedy. Their two children are named Floyd and Nellie.

A Standard History of Jasper and Newton Counties Indiana
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William I. Hoover.The unique honor of being the first democratic sheriff of Jasper County belongs to William I. Hoover of Rensselaer. It is also consensus of opinion in the county that the office was never filled by a more capable man and in a more capable manner than during the four years of Mr. Hoover's incumbency. He has grown up in the county, has been known by its citizens all his life, and has a large acquaintance extending to every township. Since leaving office Mr. Hoover has been in business at Rensselaer, but most of his active life was spent as a farmer and stock man.

Born on a farm in Marion Township of Jasper County, February 19, 1870, William I. Hoover is a son of William M. and Nancy J. (Adams) Hoover. Mr. Hoover has two brothers. He grew up in his home township, and spent his youth in assisting in the work of the home farm and in attending neighboring district schools. At the age of twenty-one he started out for himself as a farmer, but made his home with his parents until the age of twenty-six. On June 3, 1896, M. Hoover married Miss Alta May Smith, daughter of Jesse Smith. Mr. and Mrs. Hoover then started to make a home for themselves, he having bought 120 acres of land, and for several years conducted his operations as a farmer in conjunction with stock raising.

A democrat in politics, Mr. Hoover has for a number of years been one of the leaders in the party and his own personal popularity has been an important element in the party strength. In 1908 he was the unsuccessful nominee of the democratic party for the office of sheriff, but in 1910 overcame the opposition and won the election from the same rival with whom he had contested the campaign in 1908. Mr. Hoover was elected by a majority of ninety-nine votes, and his election attracted special attention because of the fact that was the democrat to have succeeded in getting himself chosen to that position. In 1912 his reelection came with a majority of 599 votes. In 1914 Mr. Hoover was unsuccessful candidate for the office of county treasurer. Since 1912 he has been the resident agent of Rensselaer for the Ford motor car.

Fraternally he is identified with the Knights of Pythias No. 82, the Modern Woodmen of America No. 4412 and the Improved Order of Red Men. Mrs. Hoover is a member of the Christian Church. To their marriage have been born four children: Victor B., Frank Donald, William Emmet, now deceased; and Irene.

A Standard History of Jasper and Newton Counties Indiana
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DAVID H. YEOMAN.It is doubtful if Jasper County has a more widely and better known citizen than Capt. David H. Yeoman of Rensselaer. It is certain that no one has more interesting associations with Jasper County's history and growth. It will be recalled that members of the Yeoman family including his father and his maternal grandfather were the very first white settlers on the side of the present City of Rensselaer. Captain Yeoman made a splendid record as a soldier in the Civil War and is the present commander of the Grand Army Post at Rensselaer. While for more than half a century he has owned and cultivated a large farm, his name has also been prominent in public affairs, and members of the present generation need not be reminded of his high position and value as a citizen.

On the old Yeoman homestead in Jasper County, he was born September 26, 1841, a son of Joseph D. and Sarah (Nowels) Yeoman. Joseph D. Yeoman was born in Fayette County, Ohio, November 17, 1803. He married there Miss Sarah Nowels, a daughter of John Nowels. In the early years of the decade of the '30s Joseph D. Yeoman and John Nowels came to Jasper County, where so far as records are obtainable they were the first permanent white settlers. They located on the present site of Rensselaer, but Joseph Yeoman subsequently moved to Newton Township and still later to what is now Union Township, and in the latter locality converted a tract of Government land into a substantial farm. He died there March 12, 1846. He was one of the most industrious and influential of the very early settlers. His wife had the distinction of being the first white woman to come to Jasper County, and too much could not be said of her courage and fortitude in facing the dangers and privations of life on the extreme frontier. She survived her husband several years. These honored pioneers now rest in the Makeever cemetery. Their children were: Cynthia, who died in childhood; Helen, who was born January 4, 1833, and died October 13, 1860, as the wife of David M. Warne; Thomas J., who as born September 26, 1837, the first white child born within the borders of Jasper County, and died February 17, 11867; David H.; and Sarah who married Frederick J. Lang of Jasper County.

In this wild district of what was then Jasper County David H. Yeoman grew to youth and manhood. From boyhood he was fond of outdoor life and all the pursuits and activities of the new and undeveloped country in which he was born. He attended one of the old fashioned log schoolhouses. Its floor was made puncheon, the seats were slab benches supported by pins, and the instruction was strictly limited to the three R's. There were few men or women either in that period who led the sedentary life of modern people, and book learning and culture were not so valuable as they are now considered. While Mr. Yeoman had only the bare essentials of a literary education, he learned and practiced all the arts of the free life of the farmer and hunter. He showed unusual skill as a hunter, and shot many deer and other kinds of wild game in Jasper County.

It was this training no doubt that made him a good soldier when his country needed him. Early in the war he enlisted in the Forty-eighth Indiana Regiment, fought at the battles of Shiloh and Iuka, and then after about a year of service was discharged on account of disability at Corinth. Returning home he assisted in organizing a company of Home Guards, in which he was first lieutenant and drill master. Soon afterwards he assisted Edwin P. Hammond, afterwards Colonel of the Eighty-seventh Regiment, and still later honored as a member of the Indiana Judiciary, in recruiting a regiment. He went to the front with the new regiment, the Eighty-seventh, and became first lieutenant of its Company A. This regiment took part in some of the great campaigns which finally brought the war to a close in the western part of the Confederacy. He was in the Atlanta campaign, the 100 days' fighting, and from Atlanta followed Sherman to the sea, cutting a swath through the Cracker State sixty miles wide, being with the Fourteenth Army Corps. At the close of the war on account of his services, he received the brevet rank of captain. After participating in the Grand Review at Washington, one of the grandest military parades given in the history of the United States, he was mustered out in June, 1865, and was soon afterward at home and actively resuming the quiet routine of agricultural life.

The old Yeoman Homestead which Captain Yeoman cultivated for some years finally came into his possession, and it was the basis for his business career, and in the old home he reared his children and gathered about him the many friends who hold him in such esteem. His farming operations were for a number of years conducted on nearly 600 acres of land.

On October 5, 1865, soon after he returned from the army, Captain Yeoman married Miss Mary E. Morris, daughter of James T. and Elizabeth (Hershman) Morris. The Morris family came to Jasper County in 1851, and James T. Morris died here in April, 1895, being survived by his widow. Mrs. Yeoman died October 4, 1910, and is now at rest in the Weston Cemetery. To their marriage were born eight children, as follows: Elpha L.; Dallas M.; Victor P.; Daisy D.; James F.; Harriett M.; David V.; and Etta B. Harriett is the wife of Albert Hopkins, of Rensselaer, and she a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Etta B., who was born in 1873, died February 6, 1895.

Captain Yeoman is now the oldest member of the Masonic Lodge at Rensselaer. He and his family were formerly members of the Methodist Church, but now belong to the First Presbyterian Church. He has at various times taken a very active part in local organizations. He served as president of the Jasper County Agricultural Society, as a member of the State Board of Agriculture, and was formerly prominent in Grange movements and was president of the State Alliance. As a soldier he was aligned with the great political party which carried off the principles for which the war was fought, but when that program had been effected he found himself more in line with other political ideas. In 1884, he was a candidate for the State Legislature on the democratic ticket. In 1892 he was candidate for Congress as a populist. In 1898 he was democratic candidate for joint representative of Jasper and Lake counties. In all these campaigns, while he was on the minority ticket, he showed such exceptional strength that he led his ticket by a large number of votes. A Standard History of Jasper and Newton Counties Indiana
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MARION L. SPITLER. Probably no one name has been for a longer time and with more of the honors that come from useful service identified with Jasper and Newton Counties than that of Spitler. They came to this section of Indiana nearly eighty years ago. Their original home was Virginia, and from that state they brought the hospitable traits which have always distinguished the family. In the different generations the members have been upright and conscientious citizens, have made creditable business records, have also figured in the professions, and have performed their share of both military and civil service.

The late Marion L. Spitler, who died at Rensselaer on November 19, 1899, was the type of citizen whose career well deserves record in this publication. He was born in Warren County, Indiana, March 12, 1836, and was a son of George W. Spitler, the founder of the family in this section of Indiana. George W. Spitler was a Virginian, and came West and after looking over the lands of different sections finally located at what is now known as Beaver City in Newton County, Indiana. That was during the decade of the '30s. He had married back in Ohio, Malinda Hirschman, and they had three children that reached maturity: Marion L., Thomas J. and Virginia, the latter becoming the wife of Judge E. P. Hammond of Lafayette. George W. Spitler was one of the foremost figures of his day in Newton and Jasper Counties. When Jasper County was created by separation from Newton he moved to Rensselaer, the new county seat, and lived there the rest of his days. He held various county offices, and among other attainments was a sound lawyer. He was killed by lightning in August, 1863. His two sons spent all their lives in Jasper County.

Marion L. Spitler grew up in Rensselaer, and acquired his primary education in the public schools and then entered the noted old Indiana institution, Wabash College, from which he was graduated in 1854, with the degrees Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts. For a time he was an educator, and also clerked in the store of Isaac D. Stackhouse in Rensselaer. He was the member of the family who made a military record which will always be prized by his descendants. During the Civil war he was a lieutenant in the Company A of the 87th Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and when he left the army was first lieutenant. From the army he returned home, and in 1868 was elected county clerk of Jasper County and served two terms of four years each. He also served a term in the State Legislature. On leaving the office of the county clerk he entered a partnership with Simon P. and David J. Thompson in the practice of law and in handling real estate. In 1896, when Simon P. Thompson was elected to the bench, Mr. Spitler retired from the active cares of life. He was a commanding figure in Jasper County, was often sought for advice, and inherited from his father the fine hospitality which always characterized his home life. His father before him was a democrat, but Marion Spitler after coming out of the war allied himself with the republican interests. He was generous to a fault, and kind and courteous at all times.

Marion L. Spitler married Mary E. Burnham, who was born in the State of Maine, and they first became acquainted in Kansas. To their marriage were born nine children, and the four now living are: Marian E., wife of Ferman B. Leaming; Charles G.; Maude E.; and Marion L., who is now living in Oklahoma City. Mr. Spitler like his father before him, was affiliated with the Mason Lodge No. 125 and the Independent Order of Off Fellows No. 143.

Charles G. Spitler, who continues the family relationship in Jasper County to the third generation, was born at Rensselaer February 18, 1868, and his schooling ended with the high school. At the age of nineteen he entered his father's abstract office, and has been chiefly identified with that line of business ever since. He now has the only complete set of abstract books in Jasper County. In politics Mr. Spitler is a republican, and has served many years as city councilman and on November 13, 1913, was elected mayor, a position he still holds, giving an efficient administration to the municipal affairs of that progressive little city. He is secretary and treasurer of the Commercial Club and in Masonry has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite and is also affiliated with the Knights of Pythias Castle Hall No. 82.

On April 1, 1886, Charles G. Spitler married Mildred B. Powell, daughter of John W. Powell, who is remembered as a former sheriff of Jasper County and is now living at Washington, D.C. Mr. and Mrs. Spitler have three children: Mildred E., wife of Delos M. Coen of South Bend; Woodhull I.; and Elizabeth V., wife of Horace M. Clark. Mr. Charles G. Spitler for years has been clerk of sales all over the county. He and his wife and children are members of the Presbyterian Church.

Woodhull I. Spitler, who was born December 14, 1887, is a graduate of the State University of Wisconsin, and is now associated with his father in the abstract, real estate and other lines of business. He was married September 2, 1913, to Edna M. Hauter.

A Standard History of Jasper and Newton Counties Indiana
The Lewis Publishing Company - Chicago and New York - 1916

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EDWARD C. ENGLISH, M.D.The practical work and influence of a capable physician are not to be measured by the ordinary standards of individual accomplishment. No profession has greater opportunities for real service to humanity, and though the work of the real doctor cannot be displayed by the same symbols which measure performance in the other industries and arts, it is nevertheless of such great human importance that it cannot be too frequently emphasized. During the past twenty years one of the men who have worked conscientiously and with a high degree of skill in the performance of their duties as physicians and surgeons in Jasper County is Dr. Edward C. English.

The name of Dr. English has become familiar to an ever widening circle of friends and patients since he first opened his office at Rensselaer in April, 1896. He was born February 14, 1861, at Danville, Illinois, a son of Joseph G. and Mary (Hicks) English. His father was one of the most prominent bankers at Danville, and for many years served as president of the First National Bank of that city from its organization in 1863. He was also a member of the State Board of Equalization of Illinois and well known over the State as a banker and citizen. He died at Danville in 1910 at the age of eighty-nine.

Dr. English was reared in his home city, and his training in the public schools was supplemented by a course at the Illinois Wesleyan College in Bloomington, from which he was graduated in 1884 with the degree Bachelor of Science. Then followed several years of varied occupation and experience, principally in the western states. In 1891 he took up the study of medicine under Dr. M.S.Brown at Danville and in the same year matriculated at Rush Medical College in Chicago, where he was graduated M.D. in 1895. This preliminary training in one of the best known schools of medical instruction in the country was supplemented by one year as intern in the Wabash Railway Hospital at Moberly, Missouri, after which he came to Rensselaer, where for many years he has been in the front rank of physicians and surgeons in Jasper County. He is a member of the Jasper and Newton Counties Medical societies and the State Medical Society and also the American Medical Association.

Fraternally his affiliations are with the Masonic order, Prairie Lodge No. 125, the Knights of Pythias, Castle Hall No. 82, and the Modern Woodmen of America, Camp No. 4412. In politics he is a republican. Dr. English has given some capable service as county health officer for four years, was for seven years on the County Board of Charities, and for a similar time was a member of the City School Board at Rensselaer.

On September 11, 1889, Doctor English married Lucy Belle Brown of Danville, Illinois. They have two sons, Walter M. and Harry E. Doctor English and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church and he is one of the trustees of the organization at Rensselaer.

A Standard History of Jasper and Newton Counties Indiana
The Lewis Publishing Company - Chicago and New York - 1916

MOSES SIGO.In traveling trough Jasper County, Indiana, a visitor cannot avoid admiring some of the fine farms that are pesented to view, and when he enters Carpenter Township is sure to note the richly cultivated and well tilled land, 140 acres of which is the property of one of the representative men of this section, Moses Sigo, who, for three years, served very efficiently in the office of township supervisor. Moses Sigo has been a farmer all his life and is well favorably known all through this section of Indiana, and has resided on his present place in Section 12 since 1891.

Moses Sigo was born April 16, 1854 in Kankakee County, Illinois, near Bourbonnais, a son of Louis and Mary R (Taylor) Sigo, natives of St Johns, Canada. He grew to manhood in his native county, attending school when opportunity offered, in the meantime learning to be a careful farmer. He continued to live in Illinois for two years after he had married and then moved to Benton County, Indiana, for one year engaging in farming near Fowler. From there he moved to Newton County, Indiana, and for six years carried on farming operations near Kentland, removing then to near Wolcott in White County. Two years later he moved to the Village of Remington and in the following year, 1891, settled on his present farm of 140 acres. Like all land in this vicinity it had to be properly drained in order to ensure profitable farming, and Mr Sigo soon began his fine system of putting down tile and through his sensible and far-seeing methods has vastly increased the value of his land. He has never engaged in any other business, from boyhood finding himself more interested in tilling the soil and urging its production of all the rich products which sustain life, than in anything else. An agricultural life has brought him health, contentment and independence.

In Kankakee County, Illinois, January 7 1880, Mr Sigo was united in marriage with Miss Philomene Beaudreau who is a daughter of Cyprian and Palagie Beaudreau. Both parents of Mrs. Sigo are of French decent but they were born in Canada. A family of nine children has been born to Mr and Mrs Sigo, most of whom live near home: Napoleon, the oldest, is a farmer in Carpenter township, married Lillian Lattimore, and they have two children, Raymond and Inez; Cordelia, who is the wife of John Kolhoff: George, who is a resident of Jordan Township, married Isabel Luers, and they have three children, Lloyd, Ione and Robert; Rose, who is the wife of Joseph Kolhoff, both the Kolhoffs being residents and farmers of Jordan Township; Emma, who is a Franciscan sister, is engaged in teaching and a parochial school at Memphis, Tennessee; Joseph E, who is a farmer near Goodland, in Newton County, married Eva Ulm; and Victor, Louise and John, all of whom live at home. Mr Sigo and family are devout Catholics and members of the Sacred Heart Church at Remington. He belongs to the Catholic Order of Foresters and at times has filled offices in the order and has served as a trustee of the church, and also of the Catholic Cemetery at Remington.

Mr Sigo has always voted with the Democratic party, and when he has been elected to office it has been because his friends believed in his honesty and efficiency and not because he sought political honors. He has been open in his advocacy of improved roads and drainage ditches, one of the latter running through his farm, bearing his name. Mr Sigo is a well-informed man and a charitable one, is a good neighbor and loyal friend and is respected by all who know him in either business or private life.

A Standard History of Jasper and Newton Counties Indiana
The Lewis Publishing Company - Chicago and New York - 1916

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Harvey W. Wood
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